click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130209
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield to my colleague and my good friend from new mexico, mr. steve pierce. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman for yielding and for his -- mr. steve pears. mr. pearce: i thank -- mr. steve pearce. mr. pearce: i thank my good friend for yielding to me. this idea is indeed a bipartisan issue. you know, our founding fathers came here from countries that had monarchs, kings. kings that could tell a person who they were to marry, what job they could have, what level of education that they might attain. they could tell you what church you must be a member of. it was those state-ordained religions that many came to this country to get away from. they came here with an idea of a government that could only declare what your freedoms were, not limit those freedoms. it was that freedom of religion that caused many of the colonies to be organized differently, by different faiths. and some by no faith at all. it was in that backdrop that the constitution was written which caused our founding fathers great pause. the initial constitution was written and could not be
should be put away. thank you. >> steve is an independent caller in michigan. >> i want to repeat what the last gentleman said. i'm a junkie on these things. this hearing demonstrated the highest kinds of ways our government should work. the questions were on point, there's was little grandstanding. there was no politicking that i could see. people did have their points compared to the haguele hearings last week. this was the highest and i'm afraid the ones for hagel had to do with the quality of the candidates, particularly, mr. brennan. >> given the fact that was sensitive information. do you feel like you learned a lot from the hearing? caller: yes, i guess i learned more about brennan than i knew. he appears to be, at least by reputation in the way they talked about him that he's not going to be so secretive as some of the past c.i.a. directors have been. i'm sure there are things he committed to that he went be able to do. >> he spent time in the c.i.a. and he was former executive deputy director from 2001-2003. bill is on the republican line. bill, hello. caller: how are you? >>
of the disadvantaged. host: laudan aron? because really what steve said is the main point. the panel just did not have a lot of data to really begin to cross-national differences on that, but it is clearly a very intuitive and logical line of research that we would love to continue to support with additional data. i did also want to point out that so many of these comments about our lifestyles and exercise and pe with children are really about prevention. not getting ill to begin with. it does seem that especially since we documented this, the pervasiveness of the help disadvantaged across the life course, trying to prevent illness early in life and keeping americans healthy is really the way to go. if we could figure out how to do that on all fronts, i think we would be in much better shape. host: a viewer tweets in -- can you go through the good news? what did you find that gives hope? guest: there are definitely a few areas where we did not find a disadvantage, and we were at the top of the heap, so to speak. one of them, ages above 75 -- age-specific mortality rates at those higher ages are defini
, democrat caller. steve. caller: good morning. i am a democrat but i tend to stay independent with things. it seems like the republicans -- it might not be true, but there is always the appearance that youant to push the pain on a broader section and towar the bottom. to that, i had a couple of questions. what is your stance on competitive bidding for rd medicare? -- four part d medicare? also, the simple fix for social security of raising the cap might even if it is just to say 200,000 dollars, and i am sure your mom did not lay bricks, so raising the medicare age to 67 for someone that laid bricks their whole life might not be great. host: congressman? guest: the caller is correct, she did not lay bricks, budget a lot of jobs. she worked for the, a dental asn later years. but you are right. on that point, the idea -- i guess his point is when you talk about raising the age, can you do it? what sort of career, what sort of rights do you have? that is an interesting discussion to have. it gets more complicated because you could say i laid bricks 30 years ago but now for the last 20 years
need. i read about steve foster from taunton in the local newspaper. he's suffering from thyroid cancer, his brother has cancer, hi wife and father both died of cancer. all four worked in the plant. yet, i i worked to larry darcy, diagnosed with kidney cancer in 199. he went out of his way to credit your company for the opportunities it gave him and his co-workers. over 180 of those co-workers from the attleboro plant that he's aware of contracted some type of cancer. i tell the story, sir, not to cast blame, the human cost of this country's nuclear development in the 1950's and 1960's is not unique to texas instruments or to attleboro. but i do believe that t.i., along with the federal government, has a responseability to the men and women that we put in harm's way. while we can't take back the exposure to the radioactive or toxic material so many suffered, what we can do is everything in our power to make sure we ease their pain today. so, sir, i'd like your opinion on how my office can work with your company and the department of labor, department of energy to ensure that we are doin
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5